MSE 113- MSE C113 – ME C124 – Mechanical Properties of Materials

Course Number: MSE 113C
Course Units: 3  

INSTRUCTOR: Professor Robert O. Ritchie

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

A presentation is given of deformation and fracture in engineering materials, including elastic and plastic deformation from simple continuum mechanics and microscopic viewpoints, dislocation theory, alloy hardening and creep deformation, fracture mechanisms, linear elastic and nonlinear elastic fracture mechanics, toughening of metals, ceramics and composites, environmentally-assisted cracking, fatigue failure, subcritical crack growth, stress/life and damage-tolerant design approaches. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES:

Engineering 45, CE 130, or equivalent 

PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE AND/OR SKILLS TEXTBOOK(S) AND/OR OTHER REQUIRED MATERIAL:

Required text: B. W. F. Hosford, Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K. (2005) 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • Provide an understanding of the mechanics and micro-mechanisms of elastic and plastic deformation, creep, fracture, and fatigue failure, as applied to metals, ceramics, composites, thin film and biological materials.
     
  • Provide a thorough introduction to the principles of fracture mechanics.
     
  • Provide practical examples of the application of fracture mechanics to design and life prediction methods and reporting.
     
  • Provide a basis for the use of fractography as a diagnostic tool for structural failures.


DESIRED COURSE OUTCOMES:

The successful student will learn:

  • Ability to use simple continuum mechanics and elasticity to determine the stresses, strains, and displacements in a loaded structure.
     
  • Understanding and mathematical modeling of the elements of plastic deformation, with respect to continuum and microscopic mechanisms.
     
  • Ability to use creep data to predict the life of structures at elevated temperatures and the understanding of mechanisms of creeep deformation and fracture.
     
  • Use of fracture mechanics to quantitatively estimate failure criteria for both elastically and plastically deforming structures, in the design of life prediction strategies, and for fracture control plans, with examples from automotive, aerospace, medical, and other industries.
     
  • Understanding of fatigue and how this affects structural lifetimes of components.
     
  • Design of metals, ceramics, composites, and biological materials for optimal failure and fatigue analysis. 


TOPICS COVERED:

Simple continuum mechanics and elasticity; stress, strain, stress concentrations; elastic deformation, Hooke’s law; plastic deformation, stress-strain curves/constitutive behavior, plastic instability, concept of a dislocation, simple dislocation theory, application to plastic deformation, grain boundaries, hardening mechanisms in metals, single-crystal slip; creep deformation, creep mechanisms in metals and ceramics, creep constitutive laws, life prediction; Griffith and Orowan theories of ideally brittle fracture, fracture in ductile and brittle materials, fractography, linear-elastic fracture mechanics, concept of fracture toughness, resistance-curves, introduction to nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics, application to design; toughening mechanisms in metals, ceramics, polymers, composites and biological materials (e.g., bone and teeth); environmentally-assisted cracking, mechanisms, fracture mechanics description (v-K curves); fatigue failure, mechanisms of fatigue in metals, ceramics and biological materials, stress-strain/life description (S/N curves, endurance strengths/fatigue limits, Goodman relationship, Neuber’s and Miner’s rules, fatigue strength reduction factors), application of fracture mechanics to fatigue-crack growth (da/dN vs. ΔK curves), mechanisms, effect of overloads, environment, etc., damage-tolerant life predictions, design against fatigue, fatigue thresholds, crack closure, small crack fracture mechanics; other mechanisms of failure, e.g., elastic buckling and wear, as time permits.

COURSE FORMAT:

Three hours of lecture per week.

CONTRIBUTION OF THE COURSE TO MEETING THE PROFESSIONAL COMPONENT:

The course presents major components of mechanics and nano-/micro-structural phenomena essential to the understanding of the failure processes in solids.

RELATIONSHIP OF THE COURSE TO UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

All materials engineering and material science students must be conversant with the basis aspects of the mechanical behavior of materials, from both a mechanics and materials science perspective. This course fulfills that objective.

ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT PROGRESS TOWARD COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • 9 homework sets
  • 2 mid-term exams
  • 1 final exam 


PERSON(S) WHO PREPARED THIS DESCRIPTION:

Professor Robert O. Ritchie