MSE 130 – Experimental Materials Science and Design

Course Number: MSE 130
Course Units: 3
 
INSTRUCTOR:  Lecturer Christopher Kumai
 

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

Three units.  Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.  This course provides a culminating experience for students approaching completion of the materials science and engineering curriculum.  Laboratory experiments are undertaken in a variety of areas from the investigations on semiconductor materials to corrosion science and elucidate the relationships among structure, processing, properties, and performance.  The principles of materials selection in engineering design are reviewed. 

COURSE PREREQUISITES:

Senior standing in materials science and engineering or consent from instructor.

PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE AND/OR SKILLS TEXTBOOK(S) AND/OR OTHER REQUIRED MATERIAL:

  • M.F. Ashby, Materials Selection in Mechanical Design, 3rd edition.
  • Reading materials assigned by the instructor.


COURSE OBJECTIVES:

The objectives of the course are to:

  • Provide the student hands-on experiences in materials science through laboratory experiments that explore the properties of materials and the interplay between processing and performance.
  • Provide the student practical experience in the search, retrieval, and analysis of technical/scientific information
  • Provide the student practical experience in the acquisition, analysis and reporting of experimental results
  • Instruct students in methodologies for materials selection to student-led projects.


DESIRED COURSE OUTCOMES:

Having successfully completed the course, the student will be able to:

  • Use research equipment (microscope, oscilloscope, etc.) for materials analysis and data acquisition.
  • Design and conduct experiments that probe materials properties.
  • Apply math, science, engineering concepts to the analysis of experimental data.
  • Work independently and function on a team.
  • Develop communication skills (oral, graphic and written).
  • Apply a methodology for materials selection to engineering problems.
  • Identify critical material properties relevant to successful design of engineering systems including the formulation of suitable material indices.
  • Locate or estimate materials data and information relevant to a successful design analysis.
  • Describe the role economic, societal, environmental, and/or political factors on materials selection and design.


TOPICS COVERED:

In order to meet the stated outcomes, course material will be drawn from a combination of the topics below.  Additional topics may be added as needed.

  • Basic electronics; design and operation of a potentiostat
  • Phase equilibria—Gibbs phase rule, binary and ternary phase diagrams
  • Semiconductors—basic concepts, pn junctions, light emitting diodes
  • Electrochemical phenomena in materials science—corrosion, anodic and cathodic polarization of materials, passivity
  • Materials and electrochemical processes in battery technology
  • Materials for solar energy conversion
  • Principles of materials design and selection including:

    1. the formulation of a suitable need statement expressing the design requirements
    2. the translation of design requirements by the identification of functions, constraints, objectives and free variables
    3. the screening of materials through the constraints
    4. the ranking of materials through the objectives
    5. the retrieval of supporting information

  • Materials and the environment—material life cycle: production, manufacture, use, and disposal


COURSE FORMAT:

Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

CONTRIBUTION OF THE COURSE TO MEETING THE PROFESSIONAL COMPONENT:

This course emphasizes the application of materials science and engineering concepts in the laboratory and in the materials selection process.  Students gain experience in the analysis of experimental data, the preparation of written reports and oral presentations; and the search, retrieval and analysis of technical/scientific information.  Students build collaboration skills through group projects and experiments.

RELATIONSHIP OF THE COURSE TO UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

The course is intended for seniors in the Department or for seniors pursuing a joint major between the Department and other engineering departments.

ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT PROGRESS TOWARD COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • Homework assignments
  • Laboratory Reports
  • Final Project Presentation
  • Final Project Report


PERSON(S) WHO PREPARED THIS DESCRIPTION:

Professor Oscar D. Dubon, Jr.