MSE 121 – Metals Processing

Course Number: MSE 121
Course Units: 3
 
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Ronald Gronsky
 

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

The principles of metals processing with emphasis on the use of processing to establish microstructures that impart desirable engineering properties. The techniques discussed include solidification, thermal and mechanical processing, powder processing, welding and joining, and surface treatments.

COURSE PREREQUISITES:
Engineering 45

PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE AND/OR SKILLS TEXTBOOK(S) AND/OR OTHER REQUIRED MATERIAL:

Required text: J. Beddoes and M.J. Biddy, Principles of Metal Manufacturing Processes, Elsevier, New York (1999) (http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/ bookdescription.cws _home/676083/description#description)

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
The sustained utility of metallic alloys in engineering applications, especially in the construction, transportation, and biomedical industries, motivates the objectives of this course to provide a fundamental and quantitative understanding of the principles and practice of metals processing. It prepares the practicing professional for competent design, execution, and assessment of the methods used for solidification, thermal treatment, shape-forming, machining, surface treatment, and joining operations in metallic systems ranging from high purity elemental constituents to complex, multi-component alloys.

DESIRED COURSE OUTCOMES:

  • Understand the primary manufacturing processes used in steelmaking and the production of aluminum.
  • Understand the microstructural / microchemical dif differences between (cast) iron and steel.
  • Understand the microstructural differences between cast and wrought metallic alloy products.
  • Understand the procedures used for controlling porosity and shrinkage during solidification processing.
  • Understand the principles and practice of directional solidification.
  • Understand the microstructural changes induced by the thermal processing of as-solidified products, including effects on dendritic segregation and microporosity.
  • Understand the microstructural mechanistic differences between hot deformation and cold deformation, and the advantages and disadvantages of each.
  • Understand the regime of validity and application of the Holloman equation to describe and predict the plastic behavior of metallic components during deformation processing.
  • Understand the microstructural ef effects of forging, extrusion, rolling, and drawing on metallic alloy components.
  • Understand the differences between hydrodynamic and boundary-layer lubrication during forming operations and the utility of each.
  • Understand the principles and practice of powder metallurgical processing.
  • Understand the principles and practice of chip control during machining of metallic components.
  • Understanding the microstructural effects of carburizing, nitriding, peening, laser hardening, anodizing and plasma deposition when used for surface treatment of metallic components.
  • Understanding the microstructural mechanisms associated with metals joining operations including heat affected zones and their mediation.
  • Understand the microstructural development of metallic thin films generated by and ion implantation methods.


TOPICS COVERED:

Materials in Manufacturing

 

  • Primary Manufacturing: Steelmaking and Aluminum Production
  • Secondary Manufacturing: Sand Casting, Permanent Mold Casting, Continuous Casing
 
Fundamentals of Solidification
  • Heat Flow during Solidification
  • Solidification Rates; Chvorinov’s Rule
  • Solidification Microstructures
  • Planar Planar, Cellular , Cellular, Dendritic Solidification
  • Porosity and Shrinkage
  • Solute Partitioning
  • Scheil Equation
  • Constitutional Supercooling
  • Zone Melting, Zone Refining, and Single Crystals
  • Control of Eutectics, Peritectics
  • Control of Inclusions

 

Deformation Processing

  • Definition and Utilization of True Strain in Quantitative rue Analysis of Plasticity
  • Origin and Utilization of the Holloman Equation
  • Cold Work vs Hot Work; Strain-Rate Sensitivity
  • Effect of Microstructure on Flow Stress
  • Friction and Lubrication in Metal Forming
  • Forging under Plane Strain Conditions
  • Extrusion, Mean Flow Stress Model
  • Drawing Operations, Principal Stresses
  • Rolling Operations, Rolling Geometries, V Von Karman Equation, Use of Rolling Tension, Torque Analysis, Hot vs Cold Rolling
  • Modeling of Deformation, Slip-Line Analyses, Finite Element Methods, Effect of Crystalline Anisotropy
 
Powder Processing Methods
  • Powder Synthesis, Isostatic Molding, Keying, Sintering, Finishing
 
Machining of Metallic Components
 
Joining Operations
  • Soldering
  • Brazing
  • Welding; Gas, elding; Arc, and Friction Stir Methods

 

Coatings for Environmental Protection

Thin Film Deposition Methods, Deposition, Electroplating, Sputtering, Ion Implantation

COURSE FORMAT:

Three hours of lecture per week

CONTRIBUTION OF THE COURSE TO MEETING THE PROFESSIONAL COMPONENT:

With its emphasis on the quantitative aspects of microstructural development, true strain during deformation processing, and time/temperature cycles for materials production, this course offers students the background needed to under understand how metallic alloys are processed for a wide range of engineering applications. For the practicing engineer, it introduces and rationalizes the salient details of alternative processing methods that might be employed to achieve performance objectives.

RELATIONSHIP OF THE COURSE TO UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

This upper division technical elective fulfills the requirement for a materials processing course in the materials science & engineering undergraduate curriculum. It also serves as an upper division technical elective for non-majors.

ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT PROGRESS TOWARD COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • Homework Assignments (25%)
  • Mid-term Examination (20%)
  • Project Report (25%)
  • Final Examination (30%)