MSE 117: Properties of Dielectric and Magnetic Materials

Course Number: MSE 117
Course Units: 3
 

INSTRUCTOR: Staff

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

Introduction to the physical principles underlying the dielectric and magnetic properties of solids. Processing-microstructure-property relationships of dielectric materials, including piezoelectric, pyroelectric, and ferroelectric oxides, and of magnetic materials, including hard- and soft ferromagnets, ferrites and magneto-optic and -resistive materials, and includes descriptions of magnetic disc data storage principles and methods. The course also covers the properties of grain boundary devices (including varistors) as well as ion-conducting and mixed conducting materials for applications in various devices such as chemical sensors, fuel cells, and electric batteries.

COURSE PREREQUISITES:

  • Physics 7A-7B-7C or Physics 7A-7B and consent of instructor
  • MSE 111 is recommended


PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE AND/OR SKILLS TEXTBOOK(S) AND/OR OTHER REQUIRED MATERIAL:

  • Required text: A. Moulson and J. Herbert, Electroceramcis, Chapman& Hall, second edition.
  • Class notes provided on website, as necessary.


COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • Introduce basic principles of dielectric and magnetic properties of solids.
  • Discuss dielectrics in DC and AC fields.
  • Familiarize students with magnetic disc data storage principles and technology. 


DESIRED COURSE OUTCOMES:

Upon completion of the course, the successful student:

  • Develops understanding of the fundamentals of polarizable solids, ferroelectricity, and magnetism.
  • Is able to relate this to the functioning of device that exploit these properties.
  • Understand how these properties may be used in device design.
  • Is familiar with the principles and applications of electrochemical devices, in particular fuel cells and batteries.


TOPICS COVERED:

  • Background: review of physic principle of polarizable materials
  • Dielectric materials and polarization: effects of DC and AC fields; AC impedance
  • Dielectric applications: capacitors and CMOS and FET devices
  • Ferroelectric materials: basic properties and relationships, and applications
  • Modification of ferroelectric properties: defect chemistry and equilibria
  • Grain boundary devices
  • Magnetic materials: principles and applications
  • Electrochemical devices principles and applications to fuel cells and batteries


COURSE FORMAT:

Three hours of lecture per week. 

CONTRIBUTION OF THE COURSE TO MEETING THE PROFESSIONAL COMPONENT:

This course contributes primarily to the students’ knowledge of engineering topics.
Design concepts are explored in some homeworks.

RELATIONSHIP OF THE COURSE TO UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

This course provides valuable information on the physical principles by which numerous practical devices function. 

ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT PROGRESS TOWARD COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • 5 homework sets
  • 2 midterm exams
  • final exam


PERSON(S) WHO PREPARED THIS DESCRIPTION:

Professor Lutgard C. De Jonghe