MSE 104 – Materials Characterization

Course Number:  MSE 104
Course Units: 4 
 
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Professor Ronald Gronsky 
 

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

This course introduces the fundamental theoretical framework for diffraction, spectroscopy and imaging methods used in the structural and compositional characterization of engineering materials. The laboratory portion of the course offers intensive instruction in the most widely practiced x-ray diffraction (XRD) methods (Laue, Debye-Scherrer, Diffractometer) for materials evaluation, and an introduction to electron microscopy using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). 

COURSE PREREQUISITES:

MSE 102

PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE AND/OR SKILLS TEXTBOOK(S) AND/OR OTHER REQUIRED MATERIAL:

Required text: B.D. Cullity and S.R. Stock, Elements of X-ray Diffraction — Third Edition, Prentice Hall, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ, (2001).

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • Provide a thorough introduction to the principles and practice of diffraction.
  • Provide practical experience in laboratory methods and reporting.
  • Provide basic descriptions of a range of common characterization methods for the determination of the structure and composition of solids.

DESIRED COURSE OUTCOMES:

The successful student will learn:

  • Theory and practice of x-ray and electron diffraction.
  • Basic elements of electron microscopy.
  • Basic aspects of optical characterization methods including Raman and infrared spectroscopy

 

TOPICS COVERED:

x-ray generation; x-ray absorption and emission; reciprocal space; geometric representation of crystals: crystallographic projections, Wulff net, Greninger charts, crystal orientation; diffraction geometry: Bragg law, Ewald sphere; reciprocal space; Laue method; Debye-Scherrer method; diffractometer methods; scattered intensities; Fourier methods; convolutions; thermal and disorder effects on diffraction; small angle scattering; stress measurements; electron microscope diffraction and imaging; Rutherford back scattering; Raman spectroscopy; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; additional methods, such as NMR, ellipsometry, Hall effect, as time permits

COURSE FORMAT:

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. 

CONTRIBUTION OF THE COURSE TO MEETING THE PROFESSIONAL COMPONENT:

The course presents major components of materials characterization essential to the understanding of the physical properties of solids.

RELATIONSHIP OF THE COURSE TO UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:

All materials engineering and material science students must be conversant with the most common materials characterization methods. This course fulfills that objective.

ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT PROGRESS TOWARD COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • 11 homework sets
  • 6 laboratory reports
  • 2 midterm exams
  • 1 final exam

PERSON(S) WHO PREPARED THIS DESCRIPTION:

Professor Lutgard C. De Jonghe